Minimize Hurricane Season 2015

Every year Hurricanes, Typhoons and Cyclones develop over the oceans. The storms that reach land can potentially cause devastation. We will be featuring some related imagery to demonstrate these remarkable, and sometimes deadly, weather formations throughout the year.

Please click the thumbnail images to view larger versions.

The season typically occurs between mid-May to the end of November, due to the warmer temperatures, but storms do sometimes form at other times of the year.

Storms that approach land are named so that they can be tracked by meteorologists.

  • Cyclones take place over the Indian Ocean
  • Hurricanes take place over the North Atlantic Ocean
  • Typhoons take place over the Pacific Ocean

 

11 May 2015 - Tropical Storm Noul

This composite image of Tropical Storm Noul was generated at 12:00 (UTC) on 5 May 2015. It is comprised of infrared data from the geostationary satellites of EUMETSAT, JMA and NOAA, overlaying a computer-generated model of the Earth, containing NASA's Blue Marble Next Generation imagery.

Tropical Storm Noul strengthened to a Category 5 storm on 10 May, as it made landfall in the Philippines. The Category 5 storm (the highest on the Saffir-Simpson scale), affected the north eastern coasts of the Philippines, and killed two people. Thousands more were forced to evacuate as the storm tore through their homes.

Tropical Storm Noul

Credit: EUMETSAT 2015

 

11 March 2015 - Tropical Cyclones Nineteen, Nathan and Pam

This composite image of Tropical Cyclones Nineteen, Nathan and Pam, was generated at 09:00 UTC on 11 March 2015.

The image is comprised of infrared data from the geostationary orbiting satellites of EUMETSAT and the JMA. Infrared data overlays a computer-generated model of the Earth, containing NASA's Blue Marble Next Generation imagery.

These storms are expected to potentially cause flash floods in the region, particularly Australia and Vanuatu.

Cyclones Nineteen, Nathan and Pam

Credit: EUMETSAT 2015

 

23 February 2015 - Tropical Cyclone Lam

EUMETSAT's MetOp-B satellite acquired this view of Tropical Cyclone Lam on approach to Australia on 19 February 2015.

The image was acquired by the AVHRR instrument and shows Lam before it made landfall as a Category Four storm in the Northern Territory.

Cyclone Lam caused heavy damage in the state along the coast, but no serious injuries. Many homes were damaged, and in some rare cases destroyed, by the strong winds and debris which the storm brought with it. Thousands of people have been affected by the disaster.

Cyclone Lam

Credit: EUMETSAT 2015

 

29 January 2015 - Tropical Cyclones Diamondra and Eunice

This composite image shows Tropical Cyclones Eunice (left) and Diamondra (right) in the Indian Ocean.

These storms are not expected to reach land, and are forecast to dissipate over the ocean over the next few days.

This image is comprised of infrared data from the geostationary orbiting satellites of EUMETSAT and the JMA. Infrared data overlays a computer-generated model of the Earth, containing NASA's Blue Marble Next Generation imagery.

Cyclones Diamondra and Eunice

Credit: EUMETSAT 2014

 

19 January 2015 - Tropical Cyclones Bansi and Chedza

A pair of Tropical Cyclones are pictured in this Meteosat-7 image, acquired on 15 January 2015.

On the left of the image is Cyclone Chedza, over the Mozambique Channel and Madagascar, and on the right is Cyclone Bansi, moving eastwards away from Mauritius and the small island of Rodrigues.

The storms have left heavy floods in their wake, across Madagascar, Mozambique and Malawi. Over two hundred people have died and over 200,000 have been left homeless in the south African nations.

Cyclones Bansi and Chedza

Credit: EUMETSAT 2015